Courses

Course Descriptions

Note: Not all courses are offered every year. If you have questions regarding specific offerings, please contact the Graduate Program Office at 416-650-8046

 

MA and PhD Courses - Linguistics Field

LAL 5120 3.0: Advanced Phonology

This course concentrates on recent developments in phonological theory within a generative framework. Specific topics include the representation of segments, autosegmental phonology, syllable structure, metrical phonology and lexical phonology.

Prerequisite:

  • an upper level half-course (3000 or 4000-level) in phonology

Integrated with the undergraduate course AP LING 4120 3.0.

LAL 5140 3.0: Advanced Syntax

This course aims at providing students with an in-depth understanding of the interaction between theoretical assumptions, analysis and data in syntax. The course concentrates primarily on Minimalist approaches to raising and control, PRO, Case features, (wh)-operators, and phases. Involves primary literature.

Prerequisite:

  • an upper level half-course (3000 or 4000-level) in syntax

Integrated with the undergraduate course AP LING 4140 3.0.

LAL 5150 3.0: Topics in the Syntax-Semantics Interface

This course explores issues at the syntax-semantics interface. It covers quantificational structures, event semantics and structural encodings of discourse related properties such as topic-comment, theme-rheme, and focus-presupposition structures in various languages.

Prerequisite:

  • an upper level half-course (3000 or 4000-level) in syntax

Integrated with undergraduate course AP LING 4150 3.0

LAL 5230 3.0: Issues in Second Language Acquisition

An examination of the relationship between linguistic theory and second language acquisition including the nature of second language learners’ linguistic representations from both linguistic and neurolinguistic perspectives, the role of Universal Grammar, and elicitation and interpretation of second language data. In addition to considering the individual second language learner, the course also examines second language acquisition in a broader sense, including the implications of second language acquisition theory for contact and creole studies.

Prerequisites:

  • an upper level half-course (3000 or 4000-level) in phonology
  • an upper level half-course (3000 or 4000-level) in syntax or permission from the instructor.  Students who take this course may not enrol in LAL 5670 3.0: Second Language Instruction

Integrated with the undergraduate course AP LING 4240 3.0.

LAL 5350 3.0: Pidgin and Creole Linguistics

Pidgins and Creoles are languages that develop from contact between groups of people who have no common means of communication. This course examines the historical and social circumstances in which these languages, their linguistic characteristics and their relevance to linguistic theory.

Prerequisite:

  • an upper level half-course (3000 or 4000-level) in linguistics

Integrated with the undergraduate course AP LING 4350 3.0.

LAL 5400 3.0: Research in Sociolinguistic Variation and Change

This course is a practical introduction to sociolinguistic research, including methods of data collection and quantitative analysis.  Students gain experience in all stages of sociolinguistic research and write an original research paper.

Prerequisites:

  • an upper level half-course (3000 or 4000-level) in syntax
  • an upper level half-course (3000 or 4000-level) in phonology or equivalent

Integrated with undergraduate course AP LING 4400 3.0

LAL 5440 3.0: Syntactic Change

This course deals with morphosyntactic change from a broadly generative perspective. It focuses on large-scale changes, changes resulting in dialectical variation, and changes in progress. Both language-internal and language external mechanisms by which change takes place are considered.

Prerequisite:

  • an upper level half-course (3000 or 4000-level) in syntax

Integrated with the undergraduate course AP LING 4440 3.0.

LAL 6060 3.0: Explanation in Historical Linguistics

An examination of the motivation for and mechanisms of linguistic change and the relationship between language change and linguistic theory. Topics include the status of explanation, rule systems, analogy, typology and universals, transparency, markedness, drift, teleology, lexical diffusion, social phenomena.

Prerequisites:

  • an upper level half-course (3000 or 4000-level) in phonology
  • an upper level half-course (3000 or 4000-level) in syntax and an undergraduate course in historical linguistics

LAL 6120 3.0: Phonetics and Phonological Analysis

A graduate-level introduction to the analysis of sound production and sound systems in human language, focusing on core aspects of phonetic and phonological analysis.

LAL 6140 3.0: Grammatical Analysis

A graduate-level introduction to the analysis of grammatical systems across languages, focusing on core aspects of grammatical analysis and theory.

LAL 6320 3.0: Language Contact and Language Structure

A detailed investigation of the structural aspects of language contact. Topics covered include diffusion, linguistic areas, the structure of language continua, the implications of language contact for historical linguistics.

Prerequisites:

  • an upper level half-course (3000 or 4000-level) in phonology
  • an upper level half-course (3000 or 4000-level) in syntax

LAL 6420 3.0: Sociolinguistics and Linguistic Systems: The Speech Community

This course focuses on variation in linguistic systems and on the role of speakers in implementing and diffusing linguistic change. The framework will be the methodology and theory developed largely by William Labov, including recent developments within the paradigm and its adaptations. The implications of the findings for such fields as language and education are discussed.

Prerequisites:

  • an upper level half-course (3000 or 4000-level) in phonology
  • an upper level half-course (3000 or 4000-level) in syntax and an undergraduate course in sociolinguistics

LAL 6430 3.0: Sociolinguistics and Linguistic Systems: Linguistic Mechanisms

This course focuses on variation in linguistic systems and the linguistic factors which govern the internal development of linguistic structures: the mechanisms of change, the constraints on change and the ways in which change is embedded in the linguistic system. The framework will be the methodology and theory developed largely by William Labov.

Prerequisites:

  • an upper level half-course (3000 or 4000-level) in phonology
  • an upper level half-course (3000 or 4000-level) in syntax
  • an undergraduate course in sociolinguistics

LAL 6440 3.0: Sociolinguistics and the Individual

This course focuses on the behaviour of the individual speaker/hearer in social groups, particularly in conversational settings and on the social norms and perceptions that underlie individual behaviour. Scholars whose theoretical contributions are surveyed include Ervin-Tripp, Ferguson, Giles et al, Goffman, Lambert et al., Gumperz, Fishman, Halliday, Hymes, LePage and Tabouret-Keller. Applications to fields such as language and education and language and the law will be discussed.

Prerequisites:

  • an upper level half-course (3000 or 4000-level) in phonology
  • an upper level half-course (3000 or 4000-level) in syntax
  • an undergraduate course in sociolinguistics

LAL 6475 3.0: Topics in Language and Law

This course explores the role of language in the legal system by critically examining two interrelated areas of linguistic research: 1) studies that apply linguistic theories to legal questions (forensic linguistics), and 2) studies that investigate language use in legal settings to address power and inequality. Topics include speaker/language identification, speech acts, and legal/lay communication in courts and police interviews.

LAL 6600 3.0: Research Seminar in Theoretical Linguistics

An introduction to qualitative and quantitative research design in historical linguistics, sociolinguistics and language contact studies. This course provides a forum for the discussion and development of students’ major research papers.

MA Required Course - Applied Linguistics Field

LAL 6500 3.0: Research Methods in Applied Linguistics

The objective of this course is to develop students' awareness of the nature of research in general, and of the various approaches to research in applied linguistics in particular. Through readings, discussion, and assignments, students will be equipped with the tools necessary to create their own research projects, and the skills to critically evaluate research in the field.

MA and PhD Courses - Applied Linguistics Field

LAL 5670 3.0: Second Language Instruction

This course critically analyses issues prominent in the research, theoretical and pedagogical literature on second language acquisition, teaching and learning. Selected readings emphasize linguistic, social, psycholinguistic and educational perspectives on second language instruction. Emphasis is placed on English and French as Second/Foreign languages. Students who take this course may not enrol in LAL 5230 3.0: Issues in Second Language Acquisition. Same as EDUC 5380 3.0

LAL 6200 3.0: Second Language Assessment

This course examines the historical, theoretical, ethical, social, political and practical dimensions of second-language (L2) assessment; theoretical models of L2 ability and use; and the processes of designing, evaluating and using L2 assessments for various contexts and purposes. Same as EDUC 5561 3.0.

LAL 6220 3.0: Advanced Topics in Applied Linguistics

Investigation of a topic that is current and important in the field of Applied Linguistics and Second/Foreign Language Education. Content varies according to the research expertise of the Faculty.

LAL 6230 3.0: Reading and Writing in a Second Language: Theory to Practice

This course examines theoretical constructs relevant to reading and writing in a second language and reviews existing empirical research in order to draw implications and applications for second language pedagogy (i.e., curriculum and materials development, effective classroom practice and assessment). Same as EDUC 5381 3.0.

LAL 6235 3.0: English for Specific Purposes: Theory and Practice

This course examines current perspectives in English for Specific Purposes (ESP) with particular emphasis on academic and occupational contexts. Course themes include content-based language instruction, corpus linguistics, genre studies, critical EAP, and intercultural communication as they relate to ESP.

LAL 6250 3.0: Listening and Speaking in a Second Language: Theory to Practice

This course examines theoretical constructs relevant to listening and speaking (including pronunciation) in a second language and reviews empirical research in order to draw implications and applications for second language pedagogy: curriculum, materials development, effective classroom practice and assessment. Same as EDUC 5382 3.0.

LAL 6270 3.0: Race, Culture and Schooling

This course examines the prevailing attitudes and beliefs about race, ethnicity and culture in Canadian society and their effects on the schooling of minority group students. Policy, provision and pedagogy for integrating multicultural and anti-racist education into the mainfield curriculum are explored. Same as EDUC 5420 3.0 and SOAN 5170 3.0.

LAL 6275 3.0: Corrective Feedback

This course critically examines the theoretical underpinnings of corrective feedback and how research has addressed some of the core issues relevant to processes of both learning and teaching. The course addresses corrective feedback in both written and oral production situated in a range of classroom contexts.

LAL 6283 3.0: Urban Education

This seminar explores the social and cultural issues often associated with today’s urban schools. With reference to social class, ethnicity, race and immigration, we examine how school curricula and programs relate to the educational, social and cultural demands and needs of students. Topic areas include conceptions of urban community; urban communities, schools and the heterogeneous student population; multicultural and anti-racism education as responses to the needs of today’s students; youth culture in conflict with the school’s culture; inclusive schools. Same as EDUC 5440 3.0.

LAL 6290 3.0: Multilingual Education

This course considers multilingual education within the competing forces of multiculturalism and globalization, exploring language policy and human rights, the teaching of community and international languages locally, nationally and overseas, evolving multiliteracies, language use in virtual space, and the internationalization of education. Same as EDUC 5383 3.0.

LAL 6300 3.0: Multimodal Literacies

This course examines the changing face of literacy in our networked worlds, exploring contemporary literacy shapes, sites and practices. The course invites diverse theoretical and pedagogical perspectives on multimodal literacies, and contemplates new basics in 21st century literacy education. Same as EDUC 5385 3.0.

LAL 6350 3.0: Technology Mediated Language Teaching and Learning

This course critically examines the potential and limitations of technology-mediated language teaching and learning (TMLL) in varied language learning contexts. Learning theories, the design of learning environments and instructional approaches are reviewed in relation to language teaching methodology, curriculum design and second language acquisition theories. Web-enhanced, blended and distance language learning environments are explored through a blended learning approach.

LAL 6370 3.0: Narrative Contributions to Applied Linguistics

Narrative is a human impulse, a method of inquiry, and a source of data in applied linguistics. Sociocultural theory will be the framing lens for appreciating genres such as diasporic/immigrant autobiography, teaching tales, diary studies and essays of lived experiences of (multi)literac(ies).

LAL 6380 3.0: Sociocultural Theory and Applied Linguistics

This course serves as an introduction to Vygotskian sociocultural theory (SCT). Key SCT concepts are illuminated through narratives of teaching and learning languages. Connections will be made between SCT and other social theories of learning. Students will gain a better appreciation for the relationship between—and the contributions of—SCT research/ theory to second language classroom practice.

LAL 6400 3.0: Language in Social Thought

Students will investigate how social difference and subjectivity are produced through language. Specifically, this course links the question of language with the study of primary texts in classical and contemporary social theory in order to explore how language operates within and is constitutive of the social in human life, theoretical frameworks and analytical categories for this inquiry include Marxism, ideology, hybridity, cosmopolitanism, governmentality and performativity. This course is intended to help graduate students develop theoretical and conceptual frameworks to inform their research on language and society.

LAL 6460 3.0: Language Policy and Planning

This course provides graduate students with a survey of the field of language policy and language planning (LPLP). Using a representative range of case studies from around the world, students learn to recognize and understand the social, economic, political and ideological issues involved in LPLP. Course topics include: history of LPLP; corpus and status planning; inventory of LPLP resources; language standardization in the construction of national communities and identities; formulation of linguistic human rights; comparative LPLP analysis; institutionalization of LPLP; language purism; and promotion of non-sexist language. While the focus of the course is broadly comparative, special emphasis is placed on the history and current context of LPLP in Canada.

LAL 6700 3.0: Case Studies in Applied Linguistics

Case study is an important methodology aimed at understanding a particular phenomenon-in-context. In applied linguistics (second language education in particular) the unit of analysis may be a program, a person, a policy, a curriculum, a critical event, a location, and more. Multiple case research is also addressed. We explore critically the features of a good case study; where case study fits in the spectrum of research methods in the field of applied linguistics; what questions can best be explored via case study; and the various ways to collect and then interpret data. The materials for this exploration are extant case studies in second language contexts. In light of these insights, students work towards authoring and theorizing an original case study.

MA and PhD Courses - both Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Fields

LAL 5695 3.0: English as a World Language

The course examines a variety of issues related to the development and growth of English as a world language. Major varieties of English are studied focusing on their social, political and geographical environments as well as their linguistic characteristics.
Integrated with the undergraduate course GL/ENG 4695 3.0.

LAL 6310 3.0: Languages in Contact

A survey of language contact. Topics include multilingualism, diglossia, pidginization and creolization, language continua, interlanguage, language maintenance and language shift, language death. The educational and social issues arising from the phenomena are discussed.

LAL 6410 3.0: Language, Culture and Ideology

Exploration of the interrelationship between language, cultural patterns and value-systems, taking into account the dominant social, economic and political ideas that shape societies. Analysis of language and power, including the role of a high-status foreign language like English in selected countries.

LAL 6450 3.0: Discourse Analysis and Pragmatics

An investigation of the units of language above the level of the sentence. Topics covered include spoken vs. written discourse, conversational implicature, speech act theory, conversation analysis, information structuring in texts, cohesion and coherence, discourse structure and anaphora.

LAL 6470 3.0: Language and Social Identity

This course provides graduate students with a survey of issues in the use of language to construct and express social identity. Topics covered include: theory and method in the study of language an social identity; language variation and change; discourse and conversation; sex and gender; ethnicity; and literacy and education.  Readings focus on a survey of case studies from different sociolinguistic situations.

LAL 6480 3.0: Language, Gender and Sexuality

This course explores some of the complex ways in which gender, sexuality and language interact, drawing upon a variety of theoretical perspectives, methodologies, and findings from recent research in feminist linguistics. The course traces the major debates in the field of language, gender and sexuality, from earlier perspectives that focused on gender difference to more recent approaches that view gender and sexuality as enacted through language.

LAL 6900 3.0: Independent Study

Students may arrange to undertake independent study with a member of the program. This allows students and instructors to work on topics of mutual interest which lie outside the usual course offerings.